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Federal Legislative Cannabis Reform | Pathway towards Progress in the 117th

 

Federal Legislative Cannabis Reform | Pathway towards Progress in the 117th

As more and more states vote to legalize cannabis for adult use, the next question is whether the federal government will follow suit. The 2020 election placed Democrats in control of the Oval Office and both houses of Congress. This monopoly gives Democrats the power, if they so choose, to push for the legalization of cannabis nation-wide.

However, federal legalization of cannabis would cause some issues in the states that could threaten to derail support from members of both parties. In those states where cannabis is already legal, how would a federal law impact their ability to regulate the market in their state? States that have not legalized cannabis may lack the infrastructure to compete in this new market. To make this a true nation-wide legalization, issues such as interstate cannabis commerce and regulatory compliance would need to be addressed.

This one hour CLE, Federal Legislative Cannabis Reform | Pathway towards Progress in the 117th, explores these issues and more surrounding the federal legalization of cannabis and the possible paths such a bill could take. The discussion will be guided by four experts in cannabis law and policy.

Saphira Galoob is the Principal and CEO of The Liaison Group (TLG), D.C.’s only lobbying firm focused exclusively on the cannabis industry. Galoob works with both the House and Senate Cannabis Caucus and Working Groups and was a founding member of the National Cannabis Roundtable.

Amber Littlejohn, the Executive Director of the Minority Cannabis Business Association, bring a more local policy focus. As the senior policy advisor for the MCBA, she helps minority cannabis entrepreneurs to expand their markets. 

David Mangone, Director of Policy for The Liaison Group, focuses primarily on the financial side of the cannabis industry. He directs policies that helps connect cannabis business with access to financial services and is an expert in federal regulation and cannabis banking policy.

Dan Cohen is an associate at K & L Gates in the firm’s D.C. office. Cohen’s practice centers around regulatory compliance matters, including cryptocurrency platforms. Cohen has also published numerous articles on financial services and cannabis banking policy.

This CLE is packed with experts in all aspects of federal cannabis legalization and the paths and hurdles such legislation could face. It is a must for any attorney that practices in or wants to move into the area of cannabis law.

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